43 tagged articles Gentlemen prefer blondes

Une vie de 36 ans en images ! 31/07/2015

Une vie de 36 ans en images !

Une vie de 36 ans en images !
Une vie de 36 ans en images !
Une vie de 36 ans en images !
Une vie de 36 ans en images !
Une vie de 36 ans en images !
Une vie de 36 ans en images !
Une vie de 36 ans en images !

8 Juillet 1953 / A l’occasion de la sortie de « Gentlemen prefer blondes », Marilyn reçoit le prix de « The best friend a diamond ever had » (« La meilleure amie des diamants ») par l’Académie de joaillerie. 30/08/2015

8 Juillet 1953 /  A l’occasion de la sortie de « Gentlemen prefer blondes »,  Marilyn reçoit le prix de «  The best friend a diamond ever had » (« La meilleure amie des diamants ») par l’Académie de joaillerie.

8 Juillet 1953 /  A l’occasion de la sortie de « Gentlemen prefer blondes »,  Marilyn reçoit le prix de «  The best friend a diamond ever had » (« La meilleure amie des diamants ») par l’Académie de joaillerie.
8 Juillet 1953 /  A l’occasion de la sortie de « Gentlemen prefer blondes »,  Marilyn reçoit le prix de «  The best friend a diamond ever had » (« La meilleure amie des diamants ») par l’Académie de joaillerie.
8 Juillet 1953 /  A l’occasion de la sortie de « Gentlemen prefer blondes »,  Marilyn reçoit le prix de «  The best friend a diamond ever had » (« La meilleure amie des diamants ») par l’Académie de joaillerie.
8 Juillet 1953 /  A l’occasion de la sortie de « Gentlemen prefer blondes »,  Marilyn reçoit le prix de «  The best friend a diamond ever had » (« La meilleure amie des diamants ») par l’Académie de joaillerie.
8 Juillet 1953 /  A l’occasion de la sortie de « Gentlemen prefer blondes »,  Marilyn reçoit le prix de «  The best friend a diamond ever had » (« La meilleure amie des diamants ») par l’Académie de joaillerie.
8 Juillet 1953 /  A l’occasion de la sortie de « Gentlemen prefer blondes »,  Marilyn reçoit le prix de «  The best friend a diamond ever had » (« La meilleure amie des diamants ») par l’Académie de joaillerie.
8 Juillet 1953 /  A l’occasion de la sortie de « Gentlemen prefer blondes »,  Marilyn reçoit le prix de «  The best friend a diamond ever had » (« La meilleure amie des diamants ») par l’Académie de joaillerie.

Tags : 1953 - Académie joaillerie - Effet personnel - Frank POWOLNY - Gentlemen prefer blondes

26 Juin 1953 / Suite à la sortie du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" et du succès auprès du public de ce dernier, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL sont invitées à poser leurs empreintes devant le "Grauman's Chinese Theater" d'Hollywood, devant une foule immense et un parterre de journalistes ; l'anecdote veut que Marilyn voulait apposer sur le i de son prénom un vrai diamant, elle se ravisa pour y faire mettre un cristal, ce dernier sera volé quelques temps après la cérémonie. 01/09/2015

26 Juin 1953 / Suite à la sortie du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" et du succès auprès du public de ce dernier, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL sont invitées à poser leurs empreintes devant le "Grauman's Chinese Theater" d'Hollywood, devant une foule immense et un parterre de journalistes ; l'anecdote veut que Marilyn voulait apposer sur le i de son prénom un vrai diamant, elle se ravisa pour y faire mettre un cristal, ce dernier sera volé quelques temps après la cérémonie.
26 Juin 1953 / Suite à la sortie du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" et du succès auprès du public de ce dernier, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL sont invitées à poser leurs empreintes devant le "Grauman's Chinese Theater" d'Hollywood, devant une foule immense et un parterre de journalistes ; l'anecdote veut que Marilyn voulait apposer sur le i de son prénom un vrai diamant, elle se ravisa pour y faire mettre un cristal, ce dernier sera volé quelques temps après la cérémonie.
26 Juin 1953 / Suite à la sortie du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" et du succès auprès du public de ce dernier, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL sont invitées à poser leurs empreintes devant le "Grauman's Chinese Theater" d'Hollywood, devant une foule immense et un parterre de journalistes ; l'anecdote veut que Marilyn voulait apposer sur le i de son prénom un vrai diamant, elle se ravisa pour y faire mettre un cristal, ce dernier sera volé quelques temps après la cérémonie.
26 Juin 1953 / Suite à la sortie du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" et du succès auprès du public de ce dernier, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL sont invitées à poser leurs empreintes devant le "Grauman's Chinese Theater" d'Hollywood, devant une foule immense et un parterre de journalistes ; l'anecdote veut que Marilyn voulait apposer sur le i de son prénom un vrai diamant, elle se ravisa pour y faire mettre un cristal, ce dernier sera volé quelques temps après la cérémonie.
26 Juin 1953 / Suite à la sortie du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" et du succès auprès du public de ce dernier, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL sont invitées à poser leurs empreintes devant le "Grauman's Chinese Theater" d'Hollywood, devant une foule immense et un parterre de journalistes ; l'anecdote veut que Marilyn voulait apposer sur le i de son prénom un vrai diamant, elle se ravisa pour y faire mettre un cristal, ce dernier sera volé quelques temps après la cérémonie.
26 Juin 1953 / Suite à la sortie du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" et du succès auprès du public de ce dernier, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL sont invitées à poser leurs empreintes devant le "Grauman's Chinese Theater" d'Hollywood, devant une foule immense et un parterre de journalistes ; l'anecdote veut que Marilyn voulait apposer sur le i de son prénom un vrai diamant, elle se ravisa pour y faire mettre un cristal, ce dernier sera volé quelques temps après la cérémonie.
26 Juin 1953 / Suite à la sortie du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" et du succès auprès du public de ce dernier, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL sont invitées à poser leurs empreintes devant le "Grauman's Chinese Theater" d'Hollywood, devant une foule immense et un parterre de journalistes ; l'anecdote veut que Marilyn voulait apposer sur le i de son prénom un vrai diamant, elle se ravisa pour y faire mettre un cristal, ce dernier sera volé quelques temps après la cérémonie.
26 Juin 1953 / Suite à la sortie du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" et du succès auprès du public de ce dernier, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL sont invitées à poser leurs empreintes devant le "Grauman's Chinese Theater" d'Hollywood, devant une foule immense et un parterre de journalistes ; l'anecdote veut que Marilyn voulait apposer sur le i de son prénom un vrai diamant, elle se ravisa pour y faire mettre un cristal, ce dernier sera volé quelques temps après la cérémonie.

Tags : 1953 - Gentlemen prefer blondes - Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Jane RUSSELL

1953 / Photos Edward CLARK, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL en pleine répétition du numéro musical où elles interprètent "Two little girls from little rock" dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / PAROLES / 27/09/2015

1953 / Photos Edward CLARK, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL en pleine répétition du numéro musical où elles interprètent "Two little girls from little rock" dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / PAROLES /
We're just two little girls from Little Rock.
We lived on the wrong side of the tracks.
But the gentlemen friends who used to call,
They never did seem to mind at all.
They came to the wrong side of the tracks.

Then someone broke my heart in Little Rock,
So I up and left the pieces there.
Like a little lost lamb I roamed about,
I came to New York and I found out
That men are the same way everywhere.

I was young and determined to be wined and dined and ermined
And I worked at it all around the clock.
Now one of these days in my fancy clothes,
I'm a going back home and punch the nose
Of the one who broke my heart (the one who broke my heart)
The one who broke my heart in Little Rock, Little Rock, Little Rock... Little Rock

I'm just a little girl from Little Rock,
A horse used to be my closest pal.
Though I never did learn to read or write,
I learned about love in the pale moonlight
And now I'm an educated gal.

I learned an awful lot in Little Rock,
And here's some advice I'd like to share:
Find a gentleman who is shy or bold,
Or short or tall, or young or old..
As long as the guy's a millionaire!

For a kid from the small street I did very well on Wall Street,
Though I never owned a share of stock.
And now that I'm known in the biggest banks,
I'm going back home and give my thanks
To the one who broke my heart (the one who broke my heart)
The one who broke my heart in Little Rock!
1953 / Photos Edward CLARK, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL en pleine répétition du numéro musical où elles interprètent "Two little girls from little rock" dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / PAROLES /
1953 / Photos Edward CLARK, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL en pleine répétition du numéro musical où elles interprètent "Two little girls from little rock" dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / PAROLES /
1953 / Photos Edward CLARK, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL en pleine répétition du numéro musical où elles interprètent "Two little girls from little rock" dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / PAROLES /
1953 / Photos Edward CLARK, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL en pleine répétition du numéro musical où elles interprètent "Two little girls from little rock" dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / PAROLES /
1953 / Photos Edward CLARK, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL en pleine répétition du numéro musical où elles interprètent "Two little girls from little rock" dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / PAROLES /
1953 / Photos Edward CLARK, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL en pleine répétition du numéro musical où elles interprètent "Two little girls from little rock" dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / PAROLES /
1953 / Photos Edward CLARK, Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL en pleine répétition du numéro musical où elles interprètent "Two little girls from little rock" dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / PAROLES /

Tags : Gentlemen prefer blondes - Edward CLARK - Chanson - 1953

1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes". 03/02/2016

1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes".
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes".
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes".
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes".
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes".
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes".
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes".
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes".

Tags : Gentlemen prefer blondes - 1953

9 Février 1953 / (Part II) Marilyn reçoit le prix "Photoplay Award" de "L’étoile qui est montée le plus vite dans le ciel d’Hollywood en 1952". 22/02/2016

9 Février 1953 / (Part II) Marilyn reçoit le prix "Photoplay Award" de "L’étoile qui est montée le plus vite dans le ciel d’Hollywood en 1952".
9 Février 1953 / (Part II) Marilyn reçoit le prix "Photoplay Award" de "L’étoile qui est montée le plus vite dans le ciel d’Hollywood en 1952".
9 Février 1953 / (Part II) Marilyn reçoit le prix "Photoplay Award" de "L’étoile qui est montée le plus vite dans le ciel d’Hollywood en 1952".
9 Février 1953 / (Part II) Marilyn reçoit le prix "Photoplay Award" de "L’étoile qui est montée le plus vite dans le ciel d’Hollywood en 1952".
9 Février 1953 / (Part II) Marilyn reçoit le prix "Photoplay Award" de "L’étoile qui est montée le plus vite dans le ciel d’Hollywood en 1952".
9 Février 1953 / (Part II) Marilyn reçoit le prix "Photoplay Award" de "L’étoile qui est montée le plus vite dans le ciel d’Hollywood en 1952".
9 Février 1953 / (Part II) Marilyn reçoit le prix "Photoplay Award" de "L’étoile qui est montée le plus vite dans le ciel d’Hollywood en 1952".
9 Février 1953 / (Part II) Marilyn reçoit le prix "Photoplay Award" de "L’étoile qui est montée le plus vite dans le ciel d’Hollywood en 1952".

Tags : 1953 - Photoplay Award - 1952 - Gentlemen prefer blondes

26 Juin 1953 / (PART II) Pendant la campagne publicitaire de « Gentlemen prefer blondes », Marilyn marqua ses empreintes dans le ciment, avec Jane RUSSELL, devant le "Grauman’s Chinese Theater", au 6774 Hollywood Boulevard, faisant suite à une tradition créée par Mary PICKFORD et Douglas FAIRBANKS dans les années 20. DiMAGGIO n’y assista pas mais la rejoignit au restaurant "Chasen’s". 24/02/2016

26 Juin 1953 / (PART II) Pendant la campagne publicitaire de « Gentlemen prefer blondes », Marilyn marqua ses empreintes dans le  ciment, avec Jane RUSSELL, devant le "Grauman’s Chinese Theater", au 6774 Hollywood Boulevard, faisant suite à une tradition créée par Mary PICKFORD et Douglas FAIRBANKS dans les années 20. DiMAGGIO n’y assista pas mais la rejoignit au restaurant "Chasen’s".

26 Juin 1953 / (PART II) Pendant la campagne publicitaire de « Gentlemen prefer blondes », Marilyn marqua ses empreintes dans le  ciment, avec Jane RUSSELL, devant le "Grauman’s Chinese Theater", au 6774 Hollywood Boulevard, faisant suite à une tradition créée par Mary PICKFORD et Douglas FAIRBANKS dans les années 20. DiMAGGIO n’y assista pas mais la rejoignit au restaurant "Chasen’s".
26 Juin 1953 / (PART II) Pendant la campagne publicitaire de « Gentlemen prefer blondes », Marilyn marqua ses empreintes dans le  ciment, avec Jane RUSSELL, devant le "Grauman’s Chinese Theater", au 6774 Hollywood Boulevard, faisant suite à une tradition créée par Mary PICKFORD et Douglas FAIRBANKS dans les années 20. DiMAGGIO n’y assista pas mais la rejoignit au restaurant "Chasen’s".
26 Juin 1953 / (PART II) Pendant la campagne publicitaire de « Gentlemen prefer blondes », Marilyn marqua ses empreintes dans le  ciment, avec Jane RUSSELL, devant le "Grauman’s Chinese Theater", au 6774 Hollywood Boulevard, faisant suite à une tradition créée par Mary PICKFORD et Douglas FAIRBANKS dans les années 20. DiMAGGIO n’y assista pas mais la rejoignit au restaurant "Chasen’s".
26 Juin 1953 / (PART II) Pendant la campagne publicitaire de « Gentlemen prefer blondes », Marilyn marqua ses empreintes dans le  ciment, avec Jane RUSSELL, devant le "Grauman’s Chinese Theater", au 6774 Hollywood Boulevard, faisant suite à une tradition créée par Mary PICKFORD et Douglas FAIRBANKS dans les années 20. DiMAGGIO n’y assista pas mais la rejoignit au restaurant "Chasen’s".
26 Juin 1953 / (PART II) Pendant la campagne publicitaire de « Gentlemen prefer blondes », Marilyn marqua ses empreintes dans le  ciment, avec Jane RUSSELL, devant le "Grauman’s Chinese Theater", au 6774 Hollywood Boulevard, faisant suite à une tradition créée par Mary PICKFORD et Douglas FAIRBANKS dans les années 20. DiMAGGIO n’y assista pas mais la rejoignit au restaurant "Chasen’s".
26 Juin 1953 / (PART II) Pendant la campagne publicitaire de « Gentlemen prefer blondes », Marilyn marqua ses empreintes dans le  ciment, avec Jane RUSSELL, devant le "Grauman’s Chinese Theater", au 6774 Hollywood Boulevard, faisant suite à une tradition créée par Mary PICKFORD et Douglas FAIRBANKS dans les années 20. DiMAGGIO n’y assista pas mais la rejoignit au restaurant "Chasen’s".
26 Juin 1953 / (PART II) Pendant la campagne publicitaire de « Gentlemen prefer blondes », Marilyn marqua ses empreintes dans le  ciment, avec Jane RUSSELL, devant le "Grauman’s Chinese Theater", au 6774 Hollywood Boulevard, faisant suite à une tradition créée par Mary PICKFORD et Douglas FAIRBANKS dans les années 20. DiMAGGIO n’y assista pas mais la rejoignit au restaurant "Chasen’s".

Tags : 1953 - Joe DiMAGGIO - Gentlemen prefer blondes - Grauman's Chinese Theatre - James COLLINS

1953 / (Part II, photos Edward CLARK) Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL répétant un numéro musical du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elles chantent dès l'ouverture du film, "Two little girls from little rock". / Pour ses 26 ans (1952), alors qu'elle fêtait son anniversaire au "Bel Air Hotel", où elle vivait à l'époque, Marilyn apprit qu'elle avait décroché le rôle tant convoité de Lorelei LEE. Darryl ZANUCK, patron des studios, l'avait préféré à Betty GRABLE après avoir entendu un enregistrement non commercialisé de sa voix voluptueuse chantant « Do it again » pour les marines de "Camp Pendleton", au cours de la même année. L'autre raison - et non la moindre - pour laquelle Marilyn évinça Betty GRABLE, pourtant plus expérimentée qu'elle, fut que le contrat de Marilyn était rédigé de telle sorte qu'elle coûtait dix fois moins cher que Betty GRABLE, et même que sa partenaire dans le film, Jane RUSSELL, car celle-ci n'était pas sous contrat. L'oeuvre originale d'Anita LOOS, qui s'inspirait de la vie de H. L. MENCKEN, fut publiée en six épisodes mensuels dans le magazine "Harper's Bazaar" sous le titre « Les hommes préfèrent toujours les blondes ». Anita LOOS écrivit trois scripts de films de Jean HARLOW. Le livre inspira un film en 1928, avec Ruth TAYLOR et Alice WHITE, puis, en 1950, une comédie musicale couronnée de succès à Broadway, avec Carol CHANNING, qui fut un temps en compétition pour la version cinématographique. C'était le premier rôle de Marilyn dans une comédie musicale. Elle chantait en duo avec Jane RUSSELL « Two little girls from Little Rock » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN, « When love goes wrong » de Hoagy CARMICHËL et Harold ADAMSON, et « Bye bye baby » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Mais le véritable temps fort du film fut son solo, lorsqu'elle chanta « Diamonds are a girl's best friend » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Elle devait à l'origine porter une robe extrêmement décolletée, mais la production changea d'avis (peut-être par crainte de la censure), et Marilyn fit une apparition éblouissante, dans une somptueuse robe bustier rose avec un gros noeud et de longs gants, au milieu d'un groupe de danseurs en smokings. Ce numéro (dirigé par le chorégraphe Jack COLE) est resté le plus célèbre de toutes les comédies musicales de Marilyn. Dans l'un des numéros, coupé au montage, et connu sous le nom de « Four french dances », Marilyn et Jane apparaissaient en chapeaux en forme de tour Eiffel; on les aperçoit brièvement ainsi costumées, au début du film, quand Gus rencontre les jeunes femmes pour la première fois. Comme d'habitude, le tournage fut difficile. Jane RUSSELL raconta combien Marilyn était terrorisée, mais, malgré leur rivalité à l'écran, les deux actrices se lièrent d'amitié sur le tournage. Le directeur musical Lionel NEWMAN parla plus tard du perfectionnisme de Marilyn pendant l'enregistrement des chansons. Le réalisateur Howard HAWKS fut moins élogieux sur son insistance à refaire les prises, même lorsque lui-même était content de son travail. Il fut, par exemple, parfaitement satisfait de la première prise de « Bye, bye baby », mais Marilyn demanda à la recommencer dix fois. Grâce à son interprétation du personnage de Lorelei LEE, elle reçut le prix de « La meilleure actrice » en mars 1954, par le magazine "Photoplay" et celui, moins connu, de « La meilleure amie des diamants » par l'Académie de joaillerie. (voir articles sur le blog) 28/02/2016

1953 / (Part II, photos Edward CLARK) Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL répétant un numéro musical du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elles chantent dès l'ouverture du film, "Two little girls from little rock". / Pour ses 26 ans (1952), alors qu'elle fêtait son anniversaire au "Bel Air Hotel", où elle vivait à l'époque, Marilyn apprit qu'elle avait décroché le rôle tant convoité de Lorelei LEE. Darryl ZANUCK, patron des studios, l'avait préféré à Betty GRABLE après avoir entendu un enregistrement non commercialisé de sa voix voluptueuse chantant « Do it again » pour les marines de "Camp Pendleton", au cours de la même année.  L'autre raison - et non la moindre - pour laquelle Marilyn évinça Betty GRABLE, pourtant plus expérimentée qu'elle, fut que le contrat de Marilyn était rédigé de telle sorte qu'elle coûtait dix fois moins cher que Betty GRABLE, et même que sa partenaire dans le film, Jane RUSSELL, car celle-ci n'était pas sous contrat.  L'oeuvre originale d'Anita LOOS, qui s'inspirait de la vie de H. L. MENCKEN, fut publiée en six épisodes mensuels dans le magazine "Harper's Bazaar" sous le titre « Les hommes préfèrent toujours les blondes ».  Anita LOOS écrivit trois scripts de films de Jean HARLOW. Le livre inspira un film en 1928, avec Ruth TAYLOR et Alice WHITE, puis, en 1950, une comédie musicale couronnée de succès à Broadway, avec Carol CHANNING, qui fut un temps en compétition pour la version cinématographique.  C'était le premier rôle de Marilyn dans une comédie musicale. Elle chantait en duo avec Jane RUSSELL « Two little girls from Little Rock » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN, « When love goes wrong » de Hoagy CARMICHËL et Harold ADAMSON, et « Bye bye baby » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Mais le véritable temps fort du film fut son solo, lorsqu'elle chanta « Diamonds are a girl's best friend » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Elle devait à l'origine porter une robe extrêmement décolletée, mais la production changea d'avis (peut-être par crainte de la censure), et Marilyn fit une apparition éblouissante, dans une somptueuse robe bustier rose avec un gros noeud et de longs gants, au milieu d'un groupe de danseurs en smokings. Ce numéro (dirigé par le chorégraphe Jack COLE) est resté le plus célèbre de toutes les comédies musicales de Marilyn. Dans l'un des numéros, coupé au montage, et connu sous le nom de « Four french dances », Marilyn et Jane apparaissaient en chapeaux en forme de tour Eiffel; on les aperçoit brièvement ainsi costumées, au début du film, quand Gus rencontre les jeunes femmes pour la première fois. Comme d'habitude, le tournage fut difficile. Jane RUSSELL raconta combien Marilyn était terrorisée, mais, malgré leur rivalité à l'écran, les deux actrices se lièrent d'amitié sur le tournage. Le directeur musical Lionel NEWMAN parla plus tard du perfectionnisme de Marilyn pendant l'enregistrement des chansons. Le réalisateur Howard HAWKS fut moins élogieux sur son insistance à refaire les prises, même lorsque lui-même était content de son travail.  Il fut, par exemple, parfaitement satisfait de la première prise de « Bye, bye baby », mais Marilyn demanda à la recommencer dix fois. Grâce à son interprétation du personnage de Lorelei LEE, elle reçut le prix de « La meilleure actrice » en mars 1954, par le magazine "Photoplay"  et celui, moins connu, de « La meilleure amie des diamants » par l'Académie de joaillerie. (voir articles sur le blog)
1953 / (Part II, photos Edward CLARK) Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL répétant un numéro musical du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elles chantent dès l'ouverture du film, "Two little girls from little rock". / Pour ses 26 ans (1952), alors qu'elle fêtait son anniversaire au "Bel Air Hotel", où elle vivait à l'époque, Marilyn apprit qu'elle avait décroché le rôle tant convoité de Lorelei LEE. Darryl ZANUCK, patron des studios, l'avait préféré à Betty GRABLE après avoir entendu un enregistrement non commercialisé de sa voix voluptueuse chantant « Do it again » pour les marines de "Camp Pendleton", au cours de la même année.  L'autre raison - et non la moindre - pour laquelle Marilyn évinça Betty GRABLE, pourtant plus expérimentée qu'elle, fut que le contrat de Marilyn était rédigé de telle sorte qu'elle coûtait dix fois moins cher que Betty GRABLE, et même que sa partenaire dans le film, Jane RUSSELL, car celle-ci n'était pas sous contrat.  L'oeuvre originale d'Anita LOOS, qui s'inspirait de la vie de H. L. MENCKEN, fut publiée en six épisodes mensuels dans le magazine "Harper's Bazaar" sous le titre « Les hommes préfèrent toujours les blondes ».  Anita LOOS écrivit trois scripts de films de Jean HARLOW. Le livre inspira un film en 1928, avec Ruth TAYLOR et Alice WHITE, puis, en 1950, une comédie musicale couronnée de succès à Broadway, avec Carol CHANNING, qui fut un temps en compétition pour la version cinématographique.  C'était le premier rôle de Marilyn dans une comédie musicale. Elle chantait en duo avec Jane RUSSELL « Two little girls from Little Rock » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN, « When love goes wrong » de Hoagy CARMICHËL et Harold ADAMSON, et « Bye bye baby » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Mais le véritable temps fort du film fut son solo, lorsqu'elle chanta « Diamonds are a girl's best friend » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Elle devait à l'origine porter une robe extrêmement décolletée, mais la production changea d'avis (peut-être par crainte de la censure), et Marilyn fit une apparition éblouissante, dans une somptueuse robe bustier rose avec un gros noeud et de longs gants, au milieu d'un groupe de danseurs en smokings. Ce numéro (dirigé par le chorégraphe Jack COLE) est resté le plus célèbre de toutes les comédies musicales de Marilyn. Dans l'un des numéros, coupé au montage, et connu sous le nom de « Four french dances », Marilyn et Jane apparaissaient en chapeaux en forme de tour Eiffel; on les aperçoit brièvement ainsi costumées, au début du film, quand Gus rencontre les jeunes femmes pour la première fois. Comme d'habitude, le tournage fut difficile. Jane RUSSELL raconta combien Marilyn était terrorisée, mais, malgré leur rivalité à l'écran, les deux actrices se lièrent d'amitié sur le tournage. Le directeur musical Lionel NEWMAN parla plus tard du perfectionnisme de Marilyn pendant l'enregistrement des chansons. Le réalisateur Howard HAWKS fut moins élogieux sur son insistance à refaire les prises, même lorsque lui-même était content de son travail.  Il fut, par exemple, parfaitement satisfait de la première prise de « Bye, bye baby », mais Marilyn demanda à la recommencer dix fois. Grâce à son interprétation du personnage de Lorelei LEE, elle reçut le prix de « La meilleure actrice » en mars 1954, par le magazine "Photoplay"  et celui, moins connu, de « La meilleure amie des diamants » par l'Académie de joaillerie. (voir articles sur le blog)
1953 / (Part II, photos Edward CLARK) Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL répétant un numéro musical du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elles chantent dès l'ouverture du film, "Two little girls from little rock". / Pour ses 26 ans (1952), alors qu'elle fêtait son anniversaire au "Bel Air Hotel", où elle vivait à l'époque, Marilyn apprit qu'elle avait décroché le rôle tant convoité de Lorelei LEE. Darryl ZANUCK, patron des studios, l'avait préféré à Betty GRABLE après avoir entendu un enregistrement non commercialisé de sa voix voluptueuse chantant « Do it again » pour les marines de "Camp Pendleton", au cours de la même année.  L'autre raison - et non la moindre - pour laquelle Marilyn évinça Betty GRABLE, pourtant plus expérimentée qu'elle, fut que le contrat de Marilyn était rédigé de telle sorte qu'elle coûtait dix fois moins cher que Betty GRABLE, et même que sa partenaire dans le film, Jane RUSSELL, car celle-ci n'était pas sous contrat.  L'oeuvre originale d'Anita LOOS, qui s'inspirait de la vie de H. L. MENCKEN, fut publiée en six épisodes mensuels dans le magazine "Harper's Bazaar" sous le titre « Les hommes préfèrent toujours les blondes ».  Anita LOOS écrivit trois scripts de films de Jean HARLOW. Le livre inspira un film en 1928, avec Ruth TAYLOR et Alice WHITE, puis, en 1950, une comédie musicale couronnée de succès à Broadway, avec Carol CHANNING, qui fut un temps en compétition pour la version cinématographique.  C'était le premier rôle de Marilyn dans une comédie musicale. Elle chantait en duo avec Jane RUSSELL « Two little girls from Little Rock » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN, « When love goes wrong » de Hoagy CARMICHËL et Harold ADAMSON, et « Bye bye baby » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Mais le véritable temps fort du film fut son solo, lorsqu'elle chanta « Diamonds are a girl's best friend » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Elle devait à l'origine porter une robe extrêmement décolletée, mais la production changea d'avis (peut-être par crainte de la censure), et Marilyn fit une apparition éblouissante, dans une somptueuse robe bustier rose avec un gros noeud et de longs gants, au milieu d'un groupe de danseurs en smokings. Ce numéro (dirigé par le chorégraphe Jack COLE) est resté le plus célèbre de toutes les comédies musicales de Marilyn. Dans l'un des numéros, coupé au montage, et connu sous le nom de « Four french dances », Marilyn et Jane apparaissaient en chapeaux en forme de tour Eiffel; on les aperçoit brièvement ainsi costumées, au début du film, quand Gus rencontre les jeunes femmes pour la première fois. Comme d'habitude, le tournage fut difficile. Jane RUSSELL raconta combien Marilyn était terrorisée, mais, malgré leur rivalité à l'écran, les deux actrices se lièrent d'amitié sur le tournage. Le directeur musical Lionel NEWMAN parla plus tard du perfectionnisme de Marilyn pendant l'enregistrement des chansons. Le réalisateur Howard HAWKS fut moins élogieux sur son insistance à refaire les prises, même lorsque lui-même était content de son travail.  Il fut, par exemple, parfaitement satisfait de la première prise de « Bye, bye baby », mais Marilyn demanda à la recommencer dix fois. Grâce à son interprétation du personnage de Lorelei LEE, elle reçut le prix de « La meilleure actrice » en mars 1954, par le magazine "Photoplay"  et celui, moins connu, de « La meilleure amie des diamants » par l'Académie de joaillerie. (voir articles sur le blog)
1953 / (Part II, photos Edward CLARK) Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL répétant un numéro musical du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elles chantent dès l'ouverture du film, "Two little girls from little rock". / Pour ses 26 ans (1952), alors qu'elle fêtait son anniversaire au "Bel Air Hotel", où elle vivait à l'époque, Marilyn apprit qu'elle avait décroché le rôle tant convoité de Lorelei LEE. Darryl ZANUCK, patron des studios, l'avait préféré à Betty GRABLE après avoir entendu un enregistrement non commercialisé de sa voix voluptueuse chantant « Do it again » pour les marines de "Camp Pendleton", au cours de la même année.  L'autre raison - et non la moindre - pour laquelle Marilyn évinça Betty GRABLE, pourtant plus expérimentée qu'elle, fut que le contrat de Marilyn était rédigé de telle sorte qu'elle coûtait dix fois moins cher que Betty GRABLE, et même que sa partenaire dans le film, Jane RUSSELL, car celle-ci n'était pas sous contrat.  L'oeuvre originale d'Anita LOOS, qui s'inspirait de la vie de H. L. MENCKEN, fut publiée en six épisodes mensuels dans le magazine "Harper's Bazaar" sous le titre « Les hommes préfèrent toujours les blondes ».  Anita LOOS écrivit trois scripts de films de Jean HARLOW. Le livre inspira un film en 1928, avec Ruth TAYLOR et Alice WHITE, puis, en 1950, une comédie musicale couronnée de succès à Broadway, avec Carol CHANNING, qui fut un temps en compétition pour la version cinématographique.  C'était le premier rôle de Marilyn dans une comédie musicale. Elle chantait en duo avec Jane RUSSELL « Two little girls from Little Rock » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN, « When love goes wrong » de Hoagy CARMICHËL et Harold ADAMSON, et « Bye bye baby » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Mais le véritable temps fort du film fut son solo, lorsqu'elle chanta « Diamonds are a girl's best friend » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Elle devait à l'origine porter une robe extrêmement décolletée, mais la production changea d'avis (peut-être par crainte de la censure), et Marilyn fit une apparition éblouissante, dans une somptueuse robe bustier rose avec un gros noeud et de longs gants, au milieu d'un groupe de danseurs en smokings. Ce numéro (dirigé par le chorégraphe Jack COLE) est resté le plus célèbre de toutes les comédies musicales de Marilyn. Dans l'un des numéros, coupé au montage, et connu sous le nom de « Four french dances », Marilyn et Jane apparaissaient en chapeaux en forme de tour Eiffel; on les aperçoit brièvement ainsi costumées, au début du film, quand Gus rencontre les jeunes femmes pour la première fois. Comme d'habitude, le tournage fut difficile. Jane RUSSELL raconta combien Marilyn était terrorisée, mais, malgré leur rivalité à l'écran, les deux actrices se lièrent d'amitié sur le tournage. Le directeur musical Lionel NEWMAN parla plus tard du perfectionnisme de Marilyn pendant l'enregistrement des chansons. Le réalisateur Howard HAWKS fut moins élogieux sur son insistance à refaire les prises, même lorsque lui-même était content de son travail.  Il fut, par exemple, parfaitement satisfait de la première prise de « Bye, bye baby », mais Marilyn demanda à la recommencer dix fois. Grâce à son interprétation du personnage de Lorelei LEE, elle reçut le prix de « La meilleure actrice » en mars 1954, par le magazine "Photoplay"  et celui, moins connu, de « La meilleure amie des diamants » par l'Académie de joaillerie. (voir articles sur le blog)
1953 / (Part II, photos Edward CLARK) Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL répétant un numéro musical du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elles chantent dès l'ouverture du film, "Two little girls from little rock". / Pour ses 26 ans (1952), alors qu'elle fêtait son anniversaire au "Bel Air Hotel", où elle vivait à l'époque, Marilyn apprit qu'elle avait décroché le rôle tant convoité de Lorelei LEE. Darryl ZANUCK, patron des studios, l'avait préféré à Betty GRABLE après avoir entendu un enregistrement non commercialisé de sa voix voluptueuse chantant « Do it again » pour les marines de "Camp Pendleton", au cours de la même année.  L'autre raison - et non la moindre - pour laquelle Marilyn évinça Betty GRABLE, pourtant plus expérimentée qu'elle, fut que le contrat de Marilyn était rédigé de telle sorte qu'elle coûtait dix fois moins cher que Betty GRABLE, et même que sa partenaire dans le film, Jane RUSSELL, car celle-ci n'était pas sous contrat.  L'oeuvre originale d'Anita LOOS, qui s'inspirait de la vie de H. L. MENCKEN, fut publiée en six épisodes mensuels dans le magazine "Harper's Bazaar" sous le titre « Les hommes préfèrent toujours les blondes ».  Anita LOOS écrivit trois scripts de films de Jean HARLOW. Le livre inspira un film en 1928, avec Ruth TAYLOR et Alice WHITE, puis, en 1950, une comédie musicale couronnée de succès à Broadway, avec Carol CHANNING, qui fut un temps en compétition pour la version cinématographique.  C'était le premier rôle de Marilyn dans une comédie musicale. Elle chantait en duo avec Jane RUSSELL « Two little girls from Little Rock » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN, « When love goes wrong » de Hoagy CARMICHËL et Harold ADAMSON, et « Bye bye baby » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Mais le véritable temps fort du film fut son solo, lorsqu'elle chanta « Diamonds are a girl's best friend » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Elle devait à l'origine porter une robe extrêmement décolletée, mais la production changea d'avis (peut-être par crainte de la censure), et Marilyn fit une apparition éblouissante, dans une somptueuse robe bustier rose avec un gros noeud et de longs gants, au milieu d'un groupe de danseurs en smokings. Ce numéro (dirigé par le chorégraphe Jack COLE) est resté le plus célèbre de toutes les comédies musicales de Marilyn. Dans l'un des numéros, coupé au montage, et connu sous le nom de « Four french dances », Marilyn et Jane apparaissaient en chapeaux en forme de tour Eiffel; on les aperçoit brièvement ainsi costumées, au début du film, quand Gus rencontre les jeunes femmes pour la première fois. Comme d'habitude, le tournage fut difficile. Jane RUSSELL raconta combien Marilyn était terrorisée, mais, malgré leur rivalité à l'écran, les deux actrices se lièrent d'amitié sur le tournage. Le directeur musical Lionel NEWMAN parla plus tard du perfectionnisme de Marilyn pendant l'enregistrement des chansons. Le réalisateur Howard HAWKS fut moins élogieux sur son insistance à refaire les prises, même lorsque lui-même était content de son travail.  Il fut, par exemple, parfaitement satisfait de la première prise de « Bye, bye baby », mais Marilyn demanda à la recommencer dix fois. Grâce à son interprétation du personnage de Lorelei LEE, elle reçut le prix de « La meilleure actrice » en mars 1954, par le magazine "Photoplay"  et celui, moins connu, de « La meilleure amie des diamants » par l'Académie de joaillerie. (voir articles sur le blog)
1953 / (Part II, photos Edward CLARK) Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL répétant un numéro musical du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elles chantent dès l'ouverture du film, "Two little girls from little rock". / Pour ses 26 ans (1952), alors qu'elle fêtait son anniversaire au "Bel Air Hotel", où elle vivait à l'époque, Marilyn apprit qu'elle avait décroché le rôle tant convoité de Lorelei LEE. Darryl ZANUCK, patron des studios, l'avait préféré à Betty GRABLE après avoir entendu un enregistrement non commercialisé de sa voix voluptueuse chantant « Do it again » pour les marines de "Camp Pendleton", au cours de la même année.  L'autre raison - et non la moindre - pour laquelle Marilyn évinça Betty GRABLE, pourtant plus expérimentée qu'elle, fut que le contrat de Marilyn était rédigé de telle sorte qu'elle coûtait dix fois moins cher que Betty GRABLE, et même que sa partenaire dans le film, Jane RUSSELL, car celle-ci n'était pas sous contrat.  L'oeuvre originale d'Anita LOOS, qui s'inspirait de la vie de H. L. MENCKEN, fut publiée en six épisodes mensuels dans le magazine "Harper's Bazaar" sous le titre « Les hommes préfèrent toujours les blondes ».  Anita LOOS écrivit trois scripts de films de Jean HARLOW. Le livre inspira un film en 1928, avec Ruth TAYLOR et Alice WHITE, puis, en 1950, une comédie musicale couronnée de succès à Broadway, avec Carol CHANNING, qui fut un temps en compétition pour la version cinématographique.  C'était le premier rôle de Marilyn dans une comédie musicale. Elle chantait en duo avec Jane RUSSELL « Two little girls from Little Rock » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN, « When love goes wrong » de Hoagy CARMICHËL et Harold ADAMSON, et « Bye bye baby » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Mais le véritable temps fort du film fut son solo, lorsqu'elle chanta « Diamonds are a girl's best friend » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Elle devait à l'origine porter une robe extrêmement décolletée, mais la production changea d'avis (peut-être par crainte de la censure), et Marilyn fit une apparition éblouissante, dans une somptueuse robe bustier rose avec un gros noeud et de longs gants, au milieu d'un groupe de danseurs en smokings. Ce numéro (dirigé par le chorégraphe Jack COLE) est resté le plus célèbre de toutes les comédies musicales de Marilyn. Dans l'un des numéros, coupé au montage, et connu sous le nom de « Four french dances », Marilyn et Jane apparaissaient en chapeaux en forme de tour Eiffel; on les aperçoit brièvement ainsi costumées, au début du film, quand Gus rencontre les jeunes femmes pour la première fois. Comme d'habitude, le tournage fut difficile. Jane RUSSELL raconta combien Marilyn était terrorisée, mais, malgré leur rivalité à l'écran, les deux actrices se lièrent d'amitié sur le tournage. Le directeur musical Lionel NEWMAN parla plus tard du perfectionnisme de Marilyn pendant l'enregistrement des chansons. Le réalisateur Howard HAWKS fut moins élogieux sur son insistance à refaire les prises, même lorsque lui-même était content de son travail.  Il fut, par exemple, parfaitement satisfait de la première prise de « Bye, bye baby », mais Marilyn demanda à la recommencer dix fois. Grâce à son interprétation du personnage de Lorelei LEE, elle reçut le prix de « La meilleure actrice » en mars 1954, par le magazine "Photoplay"  et celui, moins connu, de « La meilleure amie des diamants » par l'Académie de joaillerie. (voir articles sur le blog)
1953 / (Part II, photos Edward CLARK) Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL répétant un numéro musical du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elles chantent dès l'ouverture du film, "Two little girls from little rock". / Pour ses 26 ans (1952), alors qu'elle fêtait son anniversaire au "Bel Air Hotel", où elle vivait à l'époque, Marilyn apprit qu'elle avait décroché le rôle tant convoité de Lorelei LEE. Darryl ZANUCK, patron des studios, l'avait préféré à Betty GRABLE après avoir entendu un enregistrement non commercialisé de sa voix voluptueuse chantant « Do it again » pour les marines de "Camp Pendleton", au cours de la même année.  L'autre raison - et non la moindre - pour laquelle Marilyn évinça Betty GRABLE, pourtant plus expérimentée qu'elle, fut que le contrat de Marilyn était rédigé de telle sorte qu'elle coûtait dix fois moins cher que Betty GRABLE, et même que sa partenaire dans le film, Jane RUSSELL, car celle-ci n'était pas sous contrat.  L'oeuvre originale d'Anita LOOS, qui s'inspirait de la vie de H. L. MENCKEN, fut publiée en six épisodes mensuels dans le magazine "Harper's Bazaar" sous le titre « Les hommes préfèrent toujours les blondes ».  Anita LOOS écrivit trois scripts de films de Jean HARLOW. Le livre inspira un film en 1928, avec Ruth TAYLOR et Alice WHITE, puis, en 1950, une comédie musicale couronnée de succès à Broadway, avec Carol CHANNING, qui fut un temps en compétition pour la version cinématographique.  C'était le premier rôle de Marilyn dans une comédie musicale. Elle chantait en duo avec Jane RUSSELL « Two little girls from Little Rock » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN, « When love goes wrong » de Hoagy CARMICHËL et Harold ADAMSON, et « Bye bye baby » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Mais le véritable temps fort du film fut son solo, lorsqu'elle chanta « Diamonds are a girl's best friend » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Elle devait à l'origine porter une robe extrêmement décolletée, mais la production changea d'avis (peut-être par crainte de la censure), et Marilyn fit une apparition éblouissante, dans une somptueuse robe bustier rose avec un gros noeud et de longs gants, au milieu d'un groupe de danseurs en smokings. Ce numéro (dirigé par le chorégraphe Jack COLE) est resté le plus célèbre de toutes les comédies musicales de Marilyn. Dans l'un des numéros, coupé au montage, et connu sous le nom de « Four french dances », Marilyn et Jane apparaissaient en chapeaux en forme de tour Eiffel; on les aperçoit brièvement ainsi costumées, au début du film, quand Gus rencontre les jeunes femmes pour la première fois. Comme d'habitude, le tournage fut difficile. Jane RUSSELL raconta combien Marilyn était terrorisée, mais, malgré leur rivalité à l'écran, les deux actrices se lièrent d'amitié sur le tournage. Le directeur musical Lionel NEWMAN parla plus tard du perfectionnisme de Marilyn pendant l'enregistrement des chansons. Le réalisateur Howard HAWKS fut moins élogieux sur son insistance à refaire les prises, même lorsque lui-même était content de son travail.  Il fut, par exemple, parfaitement satisfait de la première prise de « Bye, bye baby », mais Marilyn demanda à la recommencer dix fois. Grâce à son interprétation du personnage de Lorelei LEE, elle reçut le prix de « La meilleure actrice » en mars 1954, par le magazine "Photoplay"  et celui, moins connu, de « La meilleure amie des diamants » par l'Académie de joaillerie. (voir articles sur le blog)
1953 / (Part II, photos Edward CLARK) Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL répétant un numéro musical du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elles chantent dès l'ouverture du film, "Two little girls from little rock". / Pour ses 26 ans (1952), alors qu'elle fêtait son anniversaire au "Bel Air Hotel", où elle vivait à l'époque, Marilyn apprit qu'elle avait décroché le rôle tant convoité de Lorelei LEE. Darryl ZANUCK, patron des studios, l'avait préféré à Betty GRABLE après avoir entendu un enregistrement non commercialisé de sa voix voluptueuse chantant « Do it again » pour les marines de "Camp Pendleton", au cours de la même année.  L'autre raison - et non la moindre - pour laquelle Marilyn évinça Betty GRABLE, pourtant plus expérimentée qu'elle, fut que le contrat de Marilyn était rédigé de telle sorte qu'elle coûtait dix fois moins cher que Betty GRABLE, et même que sa partenaire dans le film, Jane RUSSELL, car celle-ci n'était pas sous contrat.  L'oeuvre originale d'Anita LOOS, qui s'inspirait de la vie de H. L. MENCKEN, fut publiée en six épisodes mensuels dans le magazine "Harper's Bazaar" sous le titre « Les hommes préfèrent toujours les blondes ».  Anita LOOS écrivit trois scripts de films de Jean HARLOW. Le livre inspira un film en 1928, avec Ruth TAYLOR et Alice WHITE, puis, en 1950, une comédie musicale couronnée de succès à Broadway, avec Carol CHANNING, qui fut un temps en compétition pour la version cinématographique.  C'était le premier rôle de Marilyn dans une comédie musicale. Elle chantait en duo avec Jane RUSSELL « Two little girls from Little Rock » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN, « When love goes wrong » de Hoagy CARMICHËL et Harold ADAMSON, et « Bye bye baby » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Mais le véritable temps fort du film fut son solo, lorsqu'elle chanta « Diamonds are a girl's best friend » de Jule STYNE et Leo ROBIN. Elle devait à l'origine porter une robe extrêmement décolletée, mais la production changea d'avis (peut-être par crainte de la censure), et Marilyn fit une apparition éblouissante, dans une somptueuse robe bustier rose avec un gros noeud et de longs gants, au milieu d'un groupe de danseurs en smokings. Ce numéro (dirigé par le chorégraphe Jack COLE) est resté le plus célèbre de toutes les comédies musicales de Marilyn. Dans l'un des numéros, coupé au montage, et connu sous le nom de « Four french dances », Marilyn et Jane apparaissaient en chapeaux en forme de tour Eiffel; on les aperçoit brièvement ainsi costumées, au début du film, quand Gus rencontre les jeunes femmes pour la première fois. Comme d'habitude, le tournage fut difficile. Jane RUSSELL raconta combien Marilyn était terrorisée, mais, malgré leur rivalité à l'écran, les deux actrices se lièrent d'amitié sur le tournage. Le directeur musical Lionel NEWMAN parla plus tard du perfectionnisme de Marilyn pendant l'enregistrement des chansons. Le réalisateur Howard HAWKS fut moins élogieux sur son insistance à refaire les prises, même lorsque lui-même était content de son travail.  Il fut, par exemple, parfaitement satisfait de la première prise de « Bye, bye baby », mais Marilyn demanda à la recommencer dix fois. Grâce à son interprétation du personnage de Lorelei LEE, elle reçut le prix de « La meilleure actrice » en mars 1954, par le magazine "Photoplay"  et celui, moins connu, de « La meilleure amie des diamants » par l'Académie de joaillerie. (voir articles sur le blog)

Tags : Gentlemen prefer blondes - Edward CLARK - 1953

1952-61 / UNE ALLIEE POUR MARILYN / Louella PARSONS / Date de naissance : 6 août 1881, à Freeport, Illinois. Date de décès : 9 décembre 1972, à Santa Monica, Californie. Exercice : journaliste, chroniqueuse au "Herald Examiner" (appartenant au groupe "Hearst"). Sa chronique faisait autorité à Hollywood. Elle fut l'une des plus grandes alliées de Marilyn, et sans doute la chroniqueuse la plus influente de l'industrie du cinéma- titre que sa rivale, Hedda HOPPER, aurait certainement contesté. Fin 1952 elle rencontre Marilyn pour un radio show. Début 1953 elle prit fait et cause pour Marilyn ; celle-ci pu compter sur elle pour jeter un voile sur les rumeurs et donner, en général, un tour positif à des événements peu flatteurs à l'origine. Le 1er janvier 1953, elle assista à la party pour le Cinémascope au "Cocoanut Grove" de "l'Ambassador Hotel". En 1953 Marilyn choisit sa chronique pour répondre à Joan CRAWFORD, qui s'était déchaînée contre la tenue suggestive de Marilyn à la cérémonie des récompenses de "Photoplay". Le 13 mai 1953, elle fut mise à l'honneur par Walter WINCHELL, qui organisa une soirée en son honneur au "Ciro's club". Elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Gentlemen Prefer Blondes ». Le 20 mai 1953, Marilyn assista au "Parsons Radio Show". C'est encore dans cette chronique que Marilyn expliqua à son public pourquoi elle quittait la Fox, fin 1954. Le 1er mars 1956, Marilyn et Jack WARNER annoncent qu'un accord de distribution avait été conclu pour "The prince and the showgirl" (1957), seul film produit par les "Marilyn MONROE Productions". En 1956 elle accompagna Marilyn à Londres, où elle assista à la fête organisée par Terence RATTIGAN en l'honneur de Marilyn. Le 9 juillet 1958, elle assista à une party chez Jimmy McHUGH. En juillet 1958, elle fut présente lors de la conférence de presse pour « Some like it hot ». Le 6 mars 1960, elle assista à la remise des "Golden Globe Awards". En 1960, elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Let’s Make Love ». Le 11 juin 1961, elle assista au baptême du fils de Clark GABLE, John Clark GABLE. 02/04/2016

1952-61 / UNE ALLIEE POUR MARILYN / Louella PARSONS / Date de naissance : 6 août 1881, à Freeport, Illinois.  Date de décès : 9 décembre 1972, à Santa Monica, Californie. Exercice : journaliste, chroniqueuse au "Herald Examiner" (appartenant au groupe "Hearst"). Sa chronique faisait autorité à Hollywood. Elle fut l'une des plus grandes alliées de Marilyn, et sans doute la chroniqueuse la plus influente de l'industrie du cinéma- titre que sa rivale, Hedda HOPPER, aurait certainement contesté. Fin 1952 elle rencontre Marilyn pour un radio show. Début 1953 elle prit fait et cause pour Marilyn ; celle-ci pu compter sur elle pour jeter un voile sur les rumeurs et donner, en général, un tour positif à des événements peu flatteurs à l'origine. Le 1er janvier 1953, elle assista à la party pour le Cinémascope au "Cocoanut Grove" de "l'Ambassador Hotel". En 1953 Marilyn choisit sa chronique pour répondre à Joan CRAWFORD, qui s'était déchaînée contre la tenue suggestive de Marilyn à la cérémonie des récompenses de "Photoplay". Le 13 mai 1953, elle fut mise à l'honneur par Walter WINCHELL, qui organisa une soirée en son honneur au "Ciro's club". Elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Gentlemen Prefer Blondes ». Le 20 mai 1953, Marilyn assista au "Parsons Radio Show". C'est encore dans cette chronique que Marilyn expliqua à son public pourquoi elle quittait la Fox, fin 1954. Le 1er mars 1956, Marilyn et Jack WARNER annoncent qu'un accord de distribution avait été conclu  pour "The prince and the showgirl" (1957), seul film produit par les "Marilyn MONROE Productions". En 1956 elle accompagna Marilyn à Londres, où elle assista à la fête organisée par Terence RATTIGAN en l'honneur de Marilyn. Le 9 juillet 1958, elle assista à une party chez Jimmy McHUGH. En juillet 1958, elle fut présente lors de la conférence de presse pour « Some like it hot ». Le 6 mars 1960, elle assista à la remise des "Golden Globe Awards". En 1960, elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Let’s Make Love ». Le 11 juin 1961, elle assista au baptême du fils de Clark GABLE, John Clark GABLE.

1952-61 / UNE ALLIEE POUR MARILYN / Louella PARSONS / Date de naissance : 6 août 1881, à Freeport, Illinois.  Date de décès : 9 décembre 1972, à Santa Monica, Californie. Exercice : journaliste, chroniqueuse au "Herald Examiner" (appartenant au groupe "Hearst"). Sa chronique faisait autorité à Hollywood. Elle fut l'une des plus grandes alliées de Marilyn, et sans doute la chroniqueuse la plus influente de l'industrie du cinéma- titre que sa rivale, Hedda HOPPER, aurait certainement contesté. Fin 1952 elle rencontre Marilyn pour un radio show. Début 1953 elle prit fait et cause pour Marilyn ; celle-ci pu compter sur elle pour jeter un voile sur les rumeurs et donner, en général, un tour positif à des événements peu flatteurs à l'origine. Le 1er janvier 1953, elle assista à la party pour le Cinémascope au "Cocoanut Grove" de "l'Ambassador Hotel". En 1953 Marilyn choisit sa chronique pour répondre à Joan CRAWFORD, qui s'était déchaînée contre la tenue suggestive de Marilyn à la cérémonie des récompenses de "Photoplay". Le 13 mai 1953, elle fut mise à l'honneur par Walter WINCHELL, qui organisa une soirée en son honneur au "Ciro's club". Elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Gentlemen Prefer Blondes ». Le 20 mai 1953, Marilyn assista au "Parsons Radio Show". C'est encore dans cette chronique que Marilyn expliqua à son public pourquoi elle quittait la Fox, fin 1954. Le 1er mars 1956, Marilyn et Jack WARNER annoncent qu'un accord de distribution avait été conclu  pour "The prince and the showgirl" (1957), seul film produit par les "Marilyn MONROE Productions". En 1956 elle accompagna Marilyn à Londres, où elle assista à la fête organisée par Terence RATTIGAN en l'honneur de Marilyn. Le 9 juillet 1958, elle assista à une party chez Jimmy McHUGH. En juillet 1958, elle fut présente lors de la conférence de presse pour « Some like it hot ». Le 6 mars 1960, elle assista à la remise des "Golden Globe Awards". En 1960, elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Let’s Make Love ». Le 11 juin 1961, elle assista au baptême du fils de Clark GABLE, John Clark GABLE.
1952-61 / UNE ALLIEE POUR MARILYN / Louella PARSONS / Date de naissance : 6 août 1881, à Freeport, Illinois.  Date de décès : 9 décembre 1972, à Santa Monica, Californie. Exercice : journaliste, chroniqueuse au "Herald Examiner" (appartenant au groupe "Hearst"). Sa chronique faisait autorité à Hollywood. Elle fut l'une des plus grandes alliées de Marilyn, et sans doute la chroniqueuse la plus influente de l'industrie du cinéma- titre que sa rivale, Hedda HOPPER, aurait certainement contesté. Fin 1952 elle rencontre Marilyn pour un radio show. Début 1953 elle prit fait et cause pour Marilyn ; celle-ci pu compter sur elle pour jeter un voile sur les rumeurs et donner, en général, un tour positif à des événements peu flatteurs à l'origine. Le 1er janvier 1953, elle assista à la party pour le Cinémascope au "Cocoanut Grove" de "l'Ambassador Hotel". En 1953 Marilyn choisit sa chronique pour répondre à Joan CRAWFORD, qui s'était déchaînée contre la tenue suggestive de Marilyn à la cérémonie des récompenses de "Photoplay". Le 13 mai 1953, elle fut mise à l'honneur par Walter WINCHELL, qui organisa une soirée en son honneur au "Ciro's club". Elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Gentlemen Prefer Blondes ». Le 20 mai 1953, Marilyn assista au "Parsons Radio Show". C'est encore dans cette chronique que Marilyn expliqua à son public pourquoi elle quittait la Fox, fin 1954. Le 1er mars 1956, Marilyn et Jack WARNER annoncent qu'un accord de distribution avait été conclu  pour "The prince and the showgirl" (1957), seul film produit par les "Marilyn MONROE Productions". En 1956 elle accompagna Marilyn à Londres, où elle assista à la fête organisée par Terence RATTIGAN en l'honneur de Marilyn. Le 9 juillet 1958, elle assista à une party chez Jimmy McHUGH. En juillet 1958, elle fut présente lors de la conférence de presse pour « Some like it hot ». Le 6 mars 1960, elle assista à la remise des "Golden Globe Awards". En 1960, elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Let’s Make Love ». Le 11 juin 1961, elle assista au baptême du fils de Clark GABLE, John Clark GABLE.
1952-61 / UNE ALLIEE POUR MARILYN / Louella PARSONS / Date de naissance : 6 août 1881, à Freeport, Illinois.  Date de décès : 9 décembre 1972, à Santa Monica, Californie. Exercice : journaliste, chroniqueuse au "Herald Examiner" (appartenant au groupe "Hearst"). Sa chronique faisait autorité à Hollywood. Elle fut l'une des plus grandes alliées de Marilyn, et sans doute la chroniqueuse la plus influente de l'industrie du cinéma- titre que sa rivale, Hedda HOPPER, aurait certainement contesté. Fin 1952 elle rencontre Marilyn pour un radio show. Début 1953 elle prit fait et cause pour Marilyn ; celle-ci pu compter sur elle pour jeter un voile sur les rumeurs et donner, en général, un tour positif à des événements peu flatteurs à l'origine. Le 1er janvier 1953, elle assista à la party pour le Cinémascope au "Cocoanut Grove" de "l'Ambassador Hotel". En 1953 Marilyn choisit sa chronique pour répondre à Joan CRAWFORD, qui s'était déchaînée contre la tenue suggestive de Marilyn à la cérémonie des récompenses de "Photoplay". Le 13 mai 1953, elle fut mise à l'honneur par Walter WINCHELL, qui organisa une soirée en son honneur au "Ciro's club". Elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Gentlemen Prefer Blondes ». Le 20 mai 1953, Marilyn assista au "Parsons Radio Show". C'est encore dans cette chronique que Marilyn expliqua à son public pourquoi elle quittait la Fox, fin 1954. Le 1er mars 1956, Marilyn et Jack WARNER annoncent qu'un accord de distribution avait été conclu  pour "The prince and the showgirl" (1957), seul film produit par les "Marilyn MONROE Productions". En 1956 elle accompagna Marilyn à Londres, où elle assista à la fête organisée par Terence RATTIGAN en l'honneur de Marilyn. Le 9 juillet 1958, elle assista à une party chez Jimmy McHUGH. En juillet 1958, elle fut présente lors de la conférence de presse pour « Some like it hot ». Le 6 mars 1960, elle assista à la remise des "Golden Globe Awards". En 1960, elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Let’s Make Love ». Le 11 juin 1961, elle assista au baptême du fils de Clark GABLE, John Clark GABLE.
1952-61 / UNE ALLIEE POUR MARILYN / Louella PARSONS / Date de naissance : 6 août 1881, à Freeport, Illinois.  Date de décès : 9 décembre 1972, à Santa Monica, Californie. Exercice : journaliste, chroniqueuse au "Herald Examiner" (appartenant au groupe "Hearst"). Sa chronique faisait autorité à Hollywood. Elle fut l'une des plus grandes alliées de Marilyn, et sans doute la chroniqueuse la plus influente de l'industrie du cinéma- titre que sa rivale, Hedda HOPPER, aurait certainement contesté. Fin 1952 elle rencontre Marilyn pour un radio show. Début 1953 elle prit fait et cause pour Marilyn ; celle-ci pu compter sur elle pour jeter un voile sur les rumeurs et donner, en général, un tour positif à des événements peu flatteurs à l'origine. Le 1er janvier 1953, elle assista à la party pour le Cinémascope au "Cocoanut Grove" de "l'Ambassador Hotel". En 1953 Marilyn choisit sa chronique pour répondre à Joan CRAWFORD, qui s'était déchaînée contre la tenue suggestive de Marilyn à la cérémonie des récompenses de "Photoplay". Le 13 mai 1953, elle fut mise à l'honneur par Walter WINCHELL, qui organisa une soirée en son honneur au "Ciro's club". Elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Gentlemen Prefer Blondes ». Le 20 mai 1953, Marilyn assista au "Parsons Radio Show". C'est encore dans cette chronique que Marilyn expliqua à son public pourquoi elle quittait la Fox, fin 1954. Le 1er mars 1956, Marilyn et Jack WARNER annoncent qu'un accord de distribution avait été conclu  pour "The prince and the showgirl" (1957), seul film produit par les "Marilyn MONROE Productions". En 1956 elle accompagna Marilyn à Londres, où elle assista à la fête organisée par Terence RATTIGAN en l'honneur de Marilyn. Le 9 juillet 1958, elle assista à une party chez Jimmy McHUGH. En juillet 1958, elle fut présente lors de la conférence de presse pour « Some like it hot ». Le 6 mars 1960, elle assista à la remise des "Golden Globe Awards". En 1960, elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Let’s Make Love ». Le 11 juin 1961, elle assista au baptême du fils de Clark GABLE, John Clark GABLE.
1952-61 / UNE ALLIEE POUR MARILYN / Louella PARSONS / Date de naissance : 6 août 1881, à Freeport, Illinois.  Date de décès : 9 décembre 1972, à Santa Monica, Californie. Exercice : journaliste, chroniqueuse au "Herald Examiner" (appartenant au groupe "Hearst"). Sa chronique faisait autorité à Hollywood. Elle fut l'une des plus grandes alliées de Marilyn, et sans doute la chroniqueuse la plus influente de l'industrie du cinéma- titre que sa rivale, Hedda HOPPER, aurait certainement contesté. Fin 1952 elle rencontre Marilyn pour un radio show. Début 1953 elle prit fait et cause pour Marilyn ; celle-ci pu compter sur elle pour jeter un voile sur les rumeurs et donner, en général, un tour positif à des événements peu flatteurs à l'origine. Le 1er janvier 1953, elle assista à la party pour le Cinémascope au "Cocoanut Grove" de "l'Ambassador Hotel". En 1953 Marilyn choisit sa chronique pour répondre à Joan CRAWFORD, qui s'était déchaînée contre la tenue suggestive de Marilyn à la cérémonie des récompenses de "Photoplay". Le 13 mai 1953, elle fut mise à l'honneur par Walter WINCHELL, qui organisa une soirée en son honneur au "Ciro's club". Elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Gentlemen Prefer Blondes ». Le 20 mai 1953, Marilyn assista au "Parsons Radio Show". C'est encore dans cette chronique que Marilyn expliqua à son public pourquoi elle quittait la Fox, fin 1954. Le 1er mars 1956, Marilyn et Jack WARNER annoncent qu'un accord de distribution avait été conclu  pour "The prince and the showgirl" (1957), seul film produit par les "Marilyn MONROE Productions". En 1956 elle accompagna Marilyn à Londres, où elle assista à la fête organisée par Terence RATTIGAN en l'honneur de Marilyn. Le 9 juillet 1958, elle assista à une party chez Jimmy McHUGH. En juillet 1958, elle fut présente lors de la conférence de presse pour « Some like it hot ». Le 6 mars 1960, elle assista à la remise des "Golden Globe Awards". En 1960, elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Let’s Make Love ». Le 11 juin 1961, elle assista au baptême du fils de Clark GABLE, John Clark GABLE.
1952-61 / UNE ALLIEE POUR MARILYN / Louella PARSONS / Date de naissance : 6 août 1881, à Freeport, Illinois.  Date de décès : 9 décembre 1972, à Santa Monica, Californie. Exercice : journaliste, chroniqueuse au "Herald Examiner" (appartenant au groupe "Hearst"). Sa chronique faisait autorité à Hollywood. Elle fut l'une des plus grandes alliées de Marilyn, et sans doute la chroniqueuse la plus influente de l'industrie du cinéma- titre que sa rivale, Hedda HOPPER, aurait certainement contesté. Fin 1952 elle rencontre Marilyn pour un radio show. Début 1953 elle prit fait et cause pour Marilyn ; celle-ci pu compter sur elle pour jeter un voile sur les rumeurs et donner, en général, un tour positif à des événements peu flatteurs à l'origine. Le 1er janvier 1953, elle assista à la party pour le Cinémascope au "Cocoanut Grove" de "l'Ambassador Hotel". En 1953 Marilyn choisit sa chronique pour répondre à Joan CRAWFORD, qui s'était déchaînée contre la tenue suggestive de Marilyn à la cérémonie des récompenses de "Photoplay". Le 13 mai 1953, elle fut mise à l'honneur par Walter WINCHELL, qui organisa une soirée en son honneur au "Ciro's club". Elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Gentlemen Prefer Blondes ». Le 20 mai 1953, Marilyn assista au "Parsons Radio Show". C'est encore dans cette chronique que Marilyn expliqua à son public pourquoi elle quittait la Fox, fin 1954. Le 1er mars 1956, Marilyn et Jack WARNER annoncent qu'un accord de distribution avait été conclu  pour "The prince and the showgirl" (1957), seul film produit par les "Marilyn MONROE Productions". En 1956 elle accompagna Marilyn à Londres, où elle assista à la fête organisée par Terence RATTIGAN en l'honneur de Marilyn. Le 9 juillet 1958, elle assista à une party chez Jimmy McHUGH. En juillet 1958, elle fut présente lors de la conférence de presse pour « Some like it hot ». Le 6 mars 1960, elle assista à la remise des "Golden Globe Awards". En 1960, elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Let’s Make Love ». Le 11 juin 1961, elle assista au baptême du fils de Clark GABLE, John Clark GABLE.
1952-61 / UNE ALLIEE POUR MARILYN / Louella PARSONS / Date de naissance : 6 août 1881, à Freeport, Illinois.  Date de décès : 9 décembre 1972, à Santa Monica, Californie. Exercice : journaliste, chroniqueuse au "Herald Examiner" (appartenant au groupe "Hearst"). Sa chronique faisait autorité à Hollywood. Elle fut l'une des plus grandes alliées de Marilyn, et sans doute la chroniqueuse la plus influente de l'industrie du cinéma- titre que sa rivale, Hedda HOPPER, aurait certainement contesté. Fin 1952 elle rencontre Marilyn pour un radio show. Début 1953 elle prit fait et cause pour Marilyn ; celle-ci pu compter sur elle pour jeter un voile sur les rumeurs et donner, en général, un tour positif à des événements peu flatteurs à l'origine. Le 1er janvier 1953, elle assista à la party pour le Cinémascope au "Cocoanut Grove" de "l'Ambassador Hotel". En 1953 Marilyn choisit sa chronique pour répondre à Joan CRAWFORD, qui s'était déchaînée contre la tenue suggestive de Marilyn à la cérémonie des récompenses de "Photoplay". Le 13 mai 1953, elle fut mise à l'honneur par Walter WINCHELL, qui organisa une soirée en son honneur au "Ciro's club". Elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Gentlemen Prefer Blondes ». Le 20 mai 1953, Marilyn assista au "Parsons Radio Show". C'est encore dans cette chronique que Marilyn expliqua à son public pourquoi elle quittait la Fox, fin 1954. Le 1er mars 1956, Marilyn et Jack WARNER annoncent qu'un accord de distribution avait été conclu  pour "The prince and the showgirl" (1957), seul film produit par les "Marilyn MONROE Productions". En 1956 elle accompagna Marilyn à Londres, où elle assista à la fête organisée par Terence RATTIGAN en l'honneur de Marilyn. Le 9 juillet 1958, elle assista à une party chez Jimmy McHUGH. En juillet 1958, elle fut présente lors de la conférence de presse pour « Some like it hot ». Le 6 mars 1960, elle assista à la remise des "Golden Globe Awards". En 1960, elle se rendit sur le tournage de « Let’s Make Love ». Le 11 juin 1961, elle assista au baptême du fils de Clark GABLE, John Clark GABLE.

Tags : 1952-61 - Louella PARSONS - Gentlemen prefer blondes - Press conference "Some like it hot" - Jack WARNER - 1958 - 1953 - 1956 - Let's make love - 1960 - Arthur MILLER - Soirée Jimmy McHUGH

1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / ANECDOTES AUTOUR DU FILM / "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" est la seule comédie musicale d'Howard HAWKS. Il y aborde deux sujets plutôt tabous pour l'époque : le sexe et l'argent. / Jane RUSSELL fut payée 150 000 dollars, alors que Marilyn seulement 15 000. / Jane RUSSELL étant plus grande que Marilyn, les talons des chaussures de Jane furent réduits, alors que ceux de Marilyn furent agrandis au maximum. Néanmoins la différence de taille se remarque quand même. / Un des danseurs qui accompagne Marilyn dans le numéro musical " Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" est Georges CHAKIRIS (en haut à droite sur l'escalier). / Le réalisateur voulait doubler la voix chantée de Marilyn et avait convoqué la chanteuse Marni NIXON dans ce but. Mais les studios durent admettre, tout comme Marni NIXON, que le résultat était "affreux" et Marilyn chante elle-même toutes ses chansons, mis à part quelques notes aiguës de "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" doublées par NIXON. Marni NIXON aura par la suite l'occasion de prouver son talent en doublant notamment Deborah KERR dans "Le Roi et moi" (1956) et "Elle et lui" (1957), Natalie WOOD dans "West Side Story" (1961) et Audrey HEPBURN dans "My Fair Lady" (1964). / Le film "Les hommes épousent les brunes" ("Gentlemen Marry Brunettes") de Richard SALE sorti en 1955 et dans lequel joue Jane RUSSELL peut être considéré comme une suite. 05/04/2016

1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / ANECDOTES AUTOUR DU FILM / "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" est la seule comédie musicale d'Howard HAWKS. Il y aborde deux sujets plutôt tabous pour l'époque : le sexe et l'argent. / Jane RUSSELL fut payée 150 000 dollars, alors que Marilyn seulement 15 000. / Jane RUSSELL étant plus grande que Marilyn, les talons des chaussures de Jane furent réduits, alors que ceux de Marilyn furent agrandis au maximum. Néanmoins la différence de taille se remarque quand même. / Un des danseurs qui accompagne Marilyn dans le numéro musical " Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" est Georges CHAKIRIS (en haut à droite sur l'escalier). / Le réalisateur voulait doubler la voix chantée de Marilyn et avait convoqué la chanteuse Marni NIXON dans ce but. Mais les studios durent admettre, tout comme Marni NIXON, que le résultat était "affreux" et Marilyn chante elle-même toutes ses chansons, mis à part quelques notes aiguës de "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" doublées par NIXON.  Marni NIXON aura par la suite l'occasion de prouver son talent en doublant notamment Deborah KERR dans "Le Roi et moi" (1956) et "Elle et lui" (1957), Natalie WOOD dans "West Side Story" (1961) et Audrey HEPBURN dans "My Fair Lady" (1964). / Le film "Les hommes épousent les brunes" ("Gentlemen Marry Brunettes") de Richard SALE sorti en 1955 et dans lequel joue Jane RUSSELL peut être considéré comme une suite.
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / ANECDOTES AUTOUR DU FILM / "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" est la seule comédie musicale d'Howard HAWKS. Il y aborde deux sujets plutôt tabous pour l'époque : le sexe et l'argent. / Jane RUSSELL fut payée 150 000 dollars, alors que Marilyn seulement 15 000. / Jane RUSSELL étant plus grande que Marilyn, les talons des chaussures de Jane furent réduits, alors que ceux de Marilyn furent agrandis au maximum. Néanmoins la différence de taille se remarque quand même. / Un des danseurs qui accompagne Marilyn dans le numéro musical " Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" est Georges CHAKIRIS (en haut à droite sur l'escalier). / Le réalisateur voulait doubler la voix chantée de Marilyn et avait convoqué la chanteuse Marni NIXON dans ce but. Mais les studios durent admettre, tout comme Marni NIXON, que le résultat était "affreux" et Marilyn chante elle-même toutes ses chansons, mis à part quelques notes aiguës de "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" doublées par NIXON.  Marni NIXON aura par la suite l'occasion de prouver son talent en doublant notamment Deborah KERR dans "Le Roi et moi" (1956) et "Elle et lui" (1957), Natalie WOOD dans "West Side Story" (1961) et Audrey HEPBURN dans "My Fair Lady" (1964). / Le film "Les hommes épousent les brunes" ("Gentlemen Marry Brunettes") de Richard SALE sorti en 1955 et dans lequel joue Jane RUSSELL peut être considéré comme une suite.
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / ANECDOTES AUTOUR DU FILM / "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" est la seule comédie musicale d'Howard HAWKS. Il y aborde deux sujets plutôt tabous pour l'époque : le sexe et l'argent. / Jane RUSSELL fut payée 150 000 dollars, alors que Marilyn seulement 15 000. / Jane RUSSELL étant plus grande que Marilyn, les talons des chaussures de Jane furent réduits, alors que ceux de Marilyn furent agrandis au maximum. Néanmoins la différence de taille se remarque quand même. / Un des danseurs qui accompagne Marilyn dans le numéro musical " Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" est Georges CHAKIRIS (en haut à droite sur l'escalier). / Le réalisateur voulait doubler la voix chantée de Marilyn et avait convoqué la chanteuse Marni NIXON dans ce but. Mais les studios durent admettre, tout comme Marni NIXON, que le résultat était "affreux" et Marilyn chante elle-même toutes ses chansons, mis à part quelques notes aiguës de "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" doublées par NIXON.  Marni NIXON aura par la suite l'occasion de prouver son talent en doublant notamment Deborah KERR dans "Le Roi et moi" (1956) et "Elle et lui" (1957), Natalie WOOD dans "West Side Story" (1961) et Audrey HEPBURN dans "My Fair Lady" (1964). / Le film "Les hommes épousent les brunes" ("Gentlemen Marry Brunettes") de Richard SALE sorti en 1955 et dans lequel joue Jane RUSSELL peut être considéré comme une suite.
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / ANECDOTES AUTOUR DU FILM / "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" est la seule comédie musicale d'Howard HAWKS. Il y aborde deux sujets plutôt tabous pour l'époque : le sexe et l'argent. / Jane RUSSELL fut payée 150 000 dollars, alors que Marilyn seulement 15 000. / Jane RUSSELL étant plus grande que Marilyn, les talons des chaussures de Jane furent réduits, alors que ceux de Marilyn furent agrandis au maximum. Néanmoins la différence de taille se remarque quand même. / Un des danseurs qui accompagne Marilyn dans le numéro musical " Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" est Georges CHAKIRIS (en haut à droite sur l'escalier). / Le réalisateur voulait doubler la voix chantée de Marilyn et avait convoqué la chanteuse Marni NIXON dans ce but. Mais les studios durent admettre, tout comme Marni NIXON, que le résultat était "affreux" et Marilyn chante elle-même toutes ses chansons, mis à part quelques notes aiguës de "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" doublées par NIXON.  Marni NIXON aura par la suite l'occasion de prouver son talent en doublant notamment Deborah KERR dans "Le Roi et moi" (1956) et "Elle et lui" (1957), Natalie WOOD dans "West Side Story" (1961) et Audrey HEPBURN dans "My Fair Lady" (1964). / Le film "Les hommes épousent les brunes" ("Gentlemen Marry Brunettes") de Richard SALE sorti en 1955 et dans lequel joue Jane RUSSELL peut être considéré comme une suite.
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / ANECDOTES AUTOUR DU FILM / "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" est la seule comédie musicale d'Howard HAWKS. Il y aborde deux sujets plutôt tabous pour l'époque : le sexe et l'argent. / Jane RUSSELL fut payée 150 000 dollars, alors que Marilyn seulement 15 000. / Jane RUSSELL étant plus grande que Marilyn, les talons des chaussures de Jane furent réduits, alors que ceux de Marilyn furent agrandis au maximum. Néanmoins la différence de taille se remarque quand même. / Un des danseurs qui accompagne Marilyn dans le numéro musical " Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" est Georges CHAKIRIS (en haut à droite sur l'escalier). / Le réalisateur voulait doubler la voix chantée de Marilyn et avait convoqué la chanteuse Marni NIXON dans ce but. Mais les studios durent admettre, tout comme Marni NIXON, que le résultat était "affreux" et Marilyn chante elle-même toutes ses chansons, mis à part quelques notes aiguës de "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" doublées par NIXON.  Marni NIXON aura par la suite l'occasion de prouver son talent en doublant notamment Deborah KERR dans "Le Roi et moi" (1956) et "Elle et lui" (1957), Natalie WOOD dans "West Side Story" (1961) et Audrey HEPBURN dans "My Fair Lady" (1964). / Le film "Les hommes épousent les brunes" ("Gentlemen Marry Brunettes") de Richard SALE sorti en 1955 et dans lequel joue Jane RUSSELL peut être considéré comme une suite.
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / ANECDOTES AUTOUR DU FILM / "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" est la seule comédie musicale d'Howard HAWKS. Il y aborde deux sujets plutôt tabous pour l'époque : le sexe et l'argent. / Jane RUSSELL fut payée 150 000 dollars, alors que Marilyn seulement 15 000. / Jane RUSSELL étant plus grande que Marilyn, les talons des chaussures de Jane furent réduits, alors que ceux de Marilyn furent agrandis au maximum. Néanmoins la différence de taille se remarque quand même. / Un des danseurs qui accompagne Marilyn dans le numéro musical " Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" est Georges CHAKIRIS (en haut à droite sur l'escalier). / Le réalisateur voulait doubler la voix chantée de Marilyn et avait convoqué la chanteuse Marni NIXON dans ce but. Mais les studios durent admettre, tout comme Marni NIXON, que le résultat était "affreux" et Marilyn chante elle-même toutes ses chansons, mis à part quelques notes aiguës de "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" doublées par NIXON.  Marni NIXON aura par la suite l'occasion de prouver son talent en doublant notamment Deborah KERR dans "Le Roi et moi" (1956) et "Elle et lui" (1957), Natalie WOOD dans "West Side Story" (1961) et Audrey HEPBURN dans "My Fair Lady" (1964). / Le film "Les hommes épousent les brunes" ("Gentlemen Marry Brunettes") de Richard SALE sorti en 1955 et dans lequel joue Jane RUSSELL peut être considéré comme une suite.
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / ANECDOTES AUTOUR DU FILM / "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" est la seule comédie musicale d'Howard HAWKS. Il y aborde deux sujets plutôt tabous pour l'époque : le sexe et l'argent. / Jane RUSSELL fut payée 150 000 dollars, alors que Marilyn seulement 15 000. / Jane RUSSELL étant plus grande que Marilyn, les talons des chaussures de Jane furent réduits, alors que ceux de Marilyn furent agrandis au maximum. Néanmoins la différence de taille se remarque quand même. / Un des danseurs qui accompagne Marilyn dans le numéro musical " Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" est Georges CHAKIRIS (en haut à droite sur l'escalier). / Le réalisateur voulait doubler la voix chantée de Marilyn et avait convoqué la chanteuse Marni NIXON dans ce but. Mais les studios durent admettre, tout comme Marni NIXON, que le résultat était "affreux" et Marilyn chante elle-même toutes ses chansons, mis à part quelques notes aiguës de "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" doublées par NIXON.  Marni NIXON aura par la suite l'occasion de prouver son talent en doublant notamment Deborah KERR dans "Le Roi et moi" (1956) et "Elle et lui" (1957), Natalie WOOD dans "West Side Story" (1961) et Audrey HEPBURN dans "My Fair Lady" (1964). / Le film "Les hommes épousent les brunes" ("Gentlemen Marry Brunettes") de Richard SALE sorti en 1955 et dans lequel joue Jane RUSSELL peut être considéré comme une suite.
1953 / Marilyn et Jane RUSSELL lors du tournage du film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" / ANECDOTES AUTOUR DU FILM / "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" est la seule comédie musicale d'Howard HAWKS. Il y aborde deux sujets plutôt tabous pour l'époque : le sexe et l'argent. / Jane RUSSELL fut payée 150 000 dollars, alors que Marilyn seulement 15 000. / Jane RUSSELL étant plus grande que Marilyn, les talons des chaussures de Jane furent réduits, alors que ceux de Marilyn furent agrandis au maximum. Néanmoins la différence de taille se remarque quand même. / Un des danseurs qui accompagne Marilyn dans le numéro musical " Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" est Georges CHAKIRIS (en haut à droite sur l'escalier). / Le réalisateur voulait doubler la voix chantée de Marilyn et avait convoqué la chanteuse Marni NIXON dans ce but. Mais les studios durent admettre, tout comme Marni NIXON, que le résultat était "affreux" et Marilyn chante elle-même toutes ses chansons, mis à part quelques notes aiguës de "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friends" doublées par NIXON.  Marni NIXON aura par la suite l'occasion de prouver son talent en doublant notamment Deborah KERR dans "Le Roi et moi" (1956) et "Elle et lui" (1957), Natalie WOOD dans "West Side Story" (1961) et Audrey HEPBURN dans "My Fair Lady" (1964). / Le film "Les hommes épousent les brunes" ("Gentlemen Marry Brunettes") de Richard SALE sorti en 1955 et dans lequel joue Jane RUSSELL peut être considéré comme une suite.

Tags : Gentlemen prefer blondes - 1953

1953 / PAROLES DE LA CHANSON "DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST FRIEND" / Marilyn en pleine répétition d'un de ses numéros musical les plus connus dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elle chante la fameuse chanson "Diamonds are a girl's best friend". (Photos Edward CLARK). 08/04/2016

1953 / PAROLES DE LA CHANSON "DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST FRIEND" / Marilyn en pleine répétition d'un de ses numéros musical les plus connus dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elle chante la fameuse chanson "Diamonds are a girl's best friend". (Photos Edward CLARK).
1953 / PAROLES DE LA CHANSON "DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST FRIEND" / Marilyn en pleine répétition d'un de ses numéros musical les plus connus dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elle chante la fameuse chanson "Diamonds are a girl's best friend". (Photos Edward CLARK).
1953 / PAROLES DE LA CHANSON "DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST FRIEND" / Marilyn en pleine répétition d'un de ses numéros musical les plus connus dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elle chante la fameuse chanson "Diamonds are a girl's best friend". (Photos Edward CLARK).
1953 / PAROLES DE LA CHANSON "DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST FRIEND" / Marilyn en pleine répétition d'un de ses numéros musical les plus connus dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elle chante la fameuse chanson "Diamonds are a girl's best friend". (Photos Edward CLARK).
1953 / PAROLES DE LA CHANSON "DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST FRIEND" / Marilyn en pleine répétition d'un de ses numéros musical les plus connus dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elle chante la fameuse chanson "Diamonds are a girl's best friend". (Photos Edward CLARK).
1953 / PAROLES DE LA CHANSON "DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST FRIEND" / Marilyn en pleine répétition d'un de ses numéros musical les plus connus dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elle chante la fameuse chanson "Diamonds are a girl's best friend". (Photos Edward CLARK).
1953 / PAROLES DE LA CHANSON "DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST FRIEND" / Marilyn en pleine répétition d'un de ses numéros musical les plus connus dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elle chante la fameuse chanson "Diamonds are a girl's best friend". (Photos Edward CLARK).
1953 / PAROLES DE LA CHANSON "DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST FRIEND" / Marilyn en pleine répétition d'un de ses numéros musical les plus connus dans le film "Gentlemen prefer blondes" où elle chante la fameuse chanson "Diamonds are a girl's best friend". (Photos Edward CLARK).
The French are glad to die for love.

They delight in fighting duels.
But I prefer a man who lives
And gives expensive jewels.

A kiss on the hand
May be quite continental,
But diamonds are a girl's best friend.

A kiss may be grand
But it won't pay the rental
On your humble flat
Or help you at the automat.

Men grow cold 
As girls grow old,
And we all lose our charms in the end.

But square-cut or pear-shaped,
These rocks don't loose their shape.
Diamonds are a girl's best friend.

Tiffany's!
Cartier!
Black Starr!
Frost Gorm!
Talk to me Harry Winston.
Tell me all about it!

There may come a time 
When a lass needs a lawyer,
But diamonds are a girl's best friend.

There may come a time
When a hard-boiled employer
Thinks you're awful nice,
But get that ice or else no dice.

He's your guy 
When stocks are high,
But beware when they start to descend.

It's then that those louses
Go back to their spouses.
Diamonds are a girl's best friend.

I've heard of affairs
That are strictly platonic,
But diamonds are a girl's best friend.

And I think affairs 
That you must keep liaisonic
Are better bets 
If little pets get big baguettes.

Time rolls on,
And youth is gone,
And you can't straighten up when you bend.

But stiff back 
Or stiff knees,
You stand straight at Tiffany's.

Diamonds! Diamonds!
I don't mean rhinestones!
But diamonds are a girl's best friend.

Tags : Edward CLARK - Gentlemen prefer blondes - Chanson - 1953